Reading List: August 20, 2013

Along the world’s longest border, China and India are still deciding where the border truly lies. But in this game of chicken, an uneasy peace.

The US Post Office says you haven’t received a handwritten letter in seven weeks. If you showed other people you loved them in real life as well as the internet, maybe they’d return the favor.

The Prime Minister he deposed and the judges he attempted to dismiss are now making Pakistan’s Pervez Musharraf the first-ever military official to be arraigned.

Former Chinese Communist Party official, Bo Xi Lai, is to go on trial next week. His son, Bo Guagua went to the New York Times to appeal to his homeland.

Are you pissed that the Obama administration has not cut aid to the Egyptian army? It turns out they did.

After 60 years of lying and anti-Americanism in Iran, the CIA finally admits what everyone else has admitted already: the CIA was responsible for the 1953 coup that ousted the democratically-elected, centrist leader, Mohammed Mossadegh.

Advertisements

Reading List: Friday, August 16, 2013

“The protests never stopped throughout the night and we will continue our sit-ins and demonstrations all over the country until democracy and the legitimate rule are restored in Egypt.”

~ Essam Elerian

(Muslim Brotherhood leader)

Bill Lamb, owner of Louisville’s WDRB wants to become the “dominant digital address” in the Louisville market.

Jonathan Miller offers a plan for a truce in the War on Coal on the Daily Beast (utilizing many Kentucky stereotypes).

After yesterday’s intense violence, the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt has asked its supporters to take part in a “march of anger” against the military-led government.

ABC’s Joe Brettell asks what all of us are wondering: “Is Rand Paul for real?

Rather than rape charges, Robin Thicke and Pharrell’s summer jam, Blurred Lines, has brought them into legal conflict with Marvin Gaye’s family and record label who claim they weren’t the first to think of it.

Only child? Middle Child? Baby of the family? Your birth order determines who you are.

tuesday reading list

 

“Every human being, every citizen has the right to request asylum under the declaration of human rights, under inter-American legislation, under our constitution or our law on foreigners. Snowden has the right to request asylum and it’s our country’s sovereign right to grant asylum or not. When the time comes we will decide.”

~ Ecuadorian President Rafael Corea

rebuffs threats from Washington

and Snowden’s pleas for asylum

Just 2 years after gaining independence, South Sudan depends largely on oil exports for sustenance. With reserves running low, it needs to diversify its economy.

With elections slated to happen in 7 months, the Egyptian army picks Finance Minister El-Beblawi as Premier.

Machiavelli says that it is better to be feared than loved, but the rabblerousers at Harvard say “be loved first, then feared.”

Eight years before Seal Team 6, Osama Bin Laden was pulled over for speeding in Pakistan. But those eight years brought us one kick-ass movie!

As the US prepares to leave Afghanistan (possibly with zero troops on the ground), isn’t it time we sat down and talked to the Taliban about our future apart?

the best of the sunday times

Front Page
US forces in Afghanistan must adapt to their support role just as the Afghanis must learn to lead on their own.

Business
She’s not quite the Dalai Lama, but Mata Amritanandamayi (aka Amma or “the hugging saint”), has traveled the world, spreading love and creating an empire based on hugs.

Travel
A look into Andrew Wyeth’s Pennsylvania house and boyhood home offer a glimpse into the life of an intensely energetic painter and a family of luminaries.

Sunday Review
Jo Robinson discusses the role of nutrition in health and how farmed food has lost much of the nutrition that was held by the wild foods gathered by our ancestors.

David Leonhardt pines for a new corporate tax code that is fairer, simpler, and actually makes sense. Fareed Zakaria wrote about tax reform as well on Wednesday in the Washington Post.

While the Middle East is still exploding with violence and revolution, Israel has become complacent on moving forward in a peace process with Palestine.

Magazine
The title says it all: Billy Joel on not working, not giving up drinking and not caring what Elton John says about any of it. Also, some reflection on a life of telling it like it is.

Book Review
In 41 False Starts, Janet Malcom’s collection of essays and profiles on artists and writers, a combination of biography and literary imagination makes Malcom an educational alternative to David Sedaris.

friday reading list

“Somebody has to do something, and it’s just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us.”

~ Jerry Garcia

In case you didn’t have time to watch Obama’s hour-long speech (video) on the changing War on Terror, best to check out the NYTimes’ coverage of the main points and the Code Pink interruption (video).

According to Russia, Assad has agreed to take part in peace talks with rebels and Russia may withdraw support for the human rights abuse addict.

Sure, it may give us real news in a refreshingly “treats us like adults” way, but isn’t Al Jazeera just the Qatari government trying to get our guard down?

Despite a nuclear threat from a psychotic child savior to its north, South Korea has taken the time to create the world’s most rigorous carbon market. What’s our excuse?

Feeling blue? Treat yourself to some found poetry from the Google search box.

thursday reading list

“In archaeology you uncover the unknown. In diplomacy you cover the known.”

~ Thomas Pickering

Looking for a friend? You better find one quick before loneliness leads to your death.

Indian-produced drugs are the libertarian’s wet dream. They’re cheap. They’re unregulated. They’re being recalled due to bad ingredients, poor oversight, and criminal fraud.

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto is so quick, it’s amazing he’s not already in the United States. But some hard-headed obstructionism from the old fogies in his party (the PRI) could threaten to undo his administration’s progressive streak.

You know what people in Gaza need most? KFC. How hours-old fried chicken from Egypt is in demand in the Gaza Strip.

In this EPIC long-form piece from SB Nation, Costa Rica’s killer bull has taken 17 lives, but the families of the victims just want to ride him.

Yesterday, I linked to an opinion piece on austerity being necessary for reform. Today, Quartz has come back with why it isn’t.

wednesday reading list

 

“If you can’t articulate ideas and if you can’t articulate critiques of other peoples’ ideas, then you’re powerless.”

                                                              ~ Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie, who recently wrote an Op-Ed for the New York Times lamenting the dearth of courageous politicians and activists today, has done an interview. In the LA Review of Books, Rushdie muses on what it’s like to be a persecuted (fatwahed) artist and people only wanting to talk to you about your art and your balls.

Hezbollah’s official entry into the Syrian Civil War could mean an even longer and bloodier conflict. But for some good news, the Atlantic reports that the US boasts a full third of the world’s brightest students.

In the wake of his hunger strike, Guantanamo inmate, Mohamedou Ould Slahi, is having his 466-page memoirs declassified. Sections are now available from Slate.

As millennials begin to take low-paying internet media jobs, we have begun narcissistically lamenting out own fate (and trumpeting our resiliency).

And finally, colleges nationwide are choosing an inopportune time to begin fighting the illicit use of ADHD drugs such as Adderall and Vyvanse.

following the bloodbath of the syrian civil war

We have become so accustomed to watching genocides unfold before our eyes that sometimes we forget, or find ourselves unable, to take notice. This post is to help those people who just need a little help in following the carnage so that, insha’Allah, we never have to see death on this scale again. The odds are against us.

Continue reading