friday reading list.

reading list 419

This is your next step to becoming a gentleman and a scholar.

If you haven’t been in a cave for the last 24 hours then you’ve already read it, but this insanely profane email from Maryland’s Delta Gamma Chapter head.

Among the Paris Reviews recent interviews with some of the world’s greatest writers is this incredible discussion with Ray Bradbury on the art of writing and creating his fiction.

On SB Nation, sportswriter and Around the Horn panelist Tim Cowlishaw recounts the story of his  infamous DUI from July 2007 and his struggle with alcoholism.

Jim Breyer and Nikki Burch of Grist have created an illustrated history of the Keystone XL oil pipeline. Also, now with sound effects.

With the gun control bill dead for now, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate and POLITICO all offer their autopsies.

And finally, the New York Times’ coverage on the hunt for the the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing as the city remains on lockdown.

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wednesday reading list.

paris 1927

Chosen for quality.

POLITICO’s Manu Raju, Carrie Budoff Brown and Anna Palmer follow the trail of how the immigration deal was hammered out. Note: prepare something happy to read or watch for when you finish.

John Reed of the Paris Review offers a real-life timeline of Animal Farm by George Orwell. It’s a good throwback for those of us who haven’t approached the novel since middle school english.

Alec MacGillis of The New Republic explains how, through the numerous concessions that they made to the smaller, less populous states, the founding fathers may have already doomed gun control.

Al Jazeera’s Patricia Vieira asks “Does reading make you smarter?” While there is no doubt that literature can have a huge effect on our lives, there is no panacea for making people good writers or to make them like reading.

In Bloomberg Buisinessweek, 50 famous people tell you what to do if you want to become smarter, better looking, more successful, or like Newt Gingrich?