thursday reading list

“My government is listening to the voices calling for change.”

~ Brazilian President Dilma Rouseff

While there have been plenty of scholars and politicians condemning NSA leaker Edward Snowden, Laura Frost and George Orwell argue that he is keeping Big Brother from having the final word. Michael Moynihan of Newsweek plays the other side.

Behind our Black President are more African-Americans on probation, parole, or in jail than there were slaves in 1850. Obama’s former spritiual advisor, Joshua Dubois, searches for the progress we tout.

After understanding the popular protests in Brazil’s cities, it is time to figure out the injustices truly behind them.

If you hate your job, it might be time to initiate employment with the Taliban.

Grocery store magazine racks have a history of reflecting the American life. What do today’s Good Housekeeping and Ladies’ Home Journal say about modern America?

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wednesday reading list.

paris 1927

Chosen for quality.

POLITICO’s Manu Raju, Carrie Budoff Brown and Anna Palmer follow the trail of how the immigration deal was hammered out. Note: prepare something happy to read or watch for when you finish.

John Reed of the Paris Review offers a real-life timeline of Animal Farm by George Orwell. It’s a good throwback for those of us who haven’t approached the novel since middle school english.

Alec MacGillis of The New Republic explains how, through the numerous concessions that they made to the smaller, less populous states, the founding fathers may have already doomed gun control.

Al Jazeera’s Patricia Vieira asks “Does reading make you smarter?” While there is no doubt that literature can have a huge effect on our lives, there is no panacea for making people good writers or to make them like reading.

In Bloomberg Buisinessweek, 50 famous people tell you what to do if you want to become smarter, better looking, more successful, or like Newt Gingrich?