friday reading list

“Somebody has to do something, and it’s just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us.”

~ Jerry Garcia

In case you didn’t have time to watch Obama’s hour-long speech (video) on the changing War on Terror, best to check out the NYTimes’ coverage of the main points and the Code Pink interruption (video).

According to Russia, Assad has agreed to take part in peace talks with rebels and Russia may withdraw support for the human rights abuse addict.

Sure, it may give us real news in a refreshingly “treats us like adults” way, but isn’t Al Jazeera just the Qatari government trying to get our guard down?

Despite a nuclear threat from a psychotic child savior to its north, South Korea has taken the time to create the world’s most rigorous carbon market. What’s our excuse?

Feeling blue? Treat yourself to some found poetry from the Google search box.

friday reading list

 

“Change is the process by which the future invades our lives.”

Alvin Toffler

It was tough to see how the bloody Syrian Civil War could have gotten any worse but, with Russia providing Bashar al-Assad with a batch of advanced anti-ship cruise missiles, it just got a lot worse.

There’s more jobs, more hours, better pay, and even some lower costs here in America. Here are 7 charts from Quartz on why Americans can handle a payroll tax hike.

With a bleak outlook for Pakistan’s elections, take the refreshing Shezan mango drink’s view of Pakistani politics.

Your uncle graduated from high school and he’s not taking sh-t from anyone. Here are a few one-liners from ClimateProgress on talking climate change with him.

A group of female morticians are taking the public education approach to fixing America’s unhealthy detachment from death and mortality.

wednesday reading list

 

“If you can’t articulate ideas and if you can’t articulate critiques of other peoples’ ideas, then you’re powerless.”

                                                              ~ Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie, who recently wrote an Op-Ed for the New York Times lamenting the dearth of courageous politicians and activists today, has done an interview. In the LA Review of Books, Rushdie muses on what it’s like to be a persecuted (fatwahed) artist and people only wanting to talk to you about your art and your balls.

Hezbollah’s official entry into the Syrian Civil War could mean an even longer and bloodier conflict. But for some good news, the Atlantic reports that the US boasts a full third of the world’s brightest students.

In the wake of his hunger strike, Guantanamo inmate, Mohamedou Ould Slahi, is having his 466-page memoirs declassified. Sections are now available from Slate.

As millennials begin to take low-paying internet media jobs, we have begun narcissistically lamenting out own fate (and trumpeting our resiliency).

And finally, colleges nationwide are choosing an inopportune time to begin fighting the illicit use of ADHD drugs such as Adderall and Vyvanse.

following the bloodbath of the syrian civil war

We have become so accustomed to watching genocides unfold before our eyes that sometimes we forget, or find ourselves unable, to take notice. This post is to help those people who just need a little help in following the carnage so that, insha’Allah, we never have to see death on this scale again. The odds are against us.

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thursday reading list

A cerebral smorgasbord.

If there’s one thing the US hates more than mass-murdering, democracy hating dictators, it’s Islamists. The New York Times reports on Bashar al-Assad’s campaign to bring the US over to his side on the Syrian Civil War.

Jay-Z is planning on expanding his cool sports empire to hockey. His first step, it seems is to draft Seth Jones, an African-American and, that’s right, the hottest new prospect in the NHL.

Sometimes laws are enforced. In a major win to a long-fought battle with MTR mining, the EPA has, once again, been upheld in its authority to enforce the Clean Water Act.

With an aging America, could trailer parks be the sustainable way to house everyone in relative comfort? Lisa Margonelli of the Pacific Standard says it is, then she tells us which way the ternader came from.

Possibly the world’s most measured voice on religion, The Guardian‘s Andrew Brown discusses religion’s increased link with radical violence.